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Sex trafficking happens here.

#ItHappensHere2

Central MN Sexual Assault Center

MNCASA

MN Human Trafficking Task Force

The Link

Trafficking Resource Center  

Alexandra House

Anna Marie's Alliance

National Sex Trafficking Hotline

Call: 1-888-373-7888

Text: 233733 type "Help" or "Info"

Alexandra House 24 Hour Hotline

763-780-2330

Central MN Sexual Assault Center

MNCASA

MN Human Trafficking Task Force

The Link

Trafficking Resource Center  

Alexandra House

Anna Marie's Alliance

National Sex Trafficking Hotline

Call: 1-888-373-7888

Text: 233733 type "Help" or "Info"

Alexandra House 24 Hour Hotline

763-780-2330

In order to stop sex trafficking, we must first educate the public that sex trafficking is real, and it is here. It is happening in our own community, right under our noses.

 

You want statistics?

You’re not going to find them because victims don’t want to come forward.

  • They feel ashamed.

  • They feel the situation would worsen.

  • They think they will get in trouble with the law*.

  • They don’t even know they are being trafficked.

Our children need us to invest time and energy into prevention.

 
*Minnesota Safe Harbor Law states that anyone under the age of 18 is considered a victim and cannot be charged for prostitution, even if there is consent. 

What is Sex Trafficking?

*Something of value could include (but not limited to):

  • Money

  • Place to stay/rent

  • Food

  • Clothes

  • Cell phone

  • Transportation

Sex trafficking is a sexual activity* that is exchanged for something of value*.

 

*Sexual activity does not always include sex. Sexual activity can be:

  • Web-camming

  • Internet and street-based exploitation

  • Nude or sexual photos

  • Erotic massage

  • Pornography

  • Sugar daddy arrangements

  • Stripping/ exotic dancing

  • Sex/prostitution

  • Escorting

  • Drugs and alcohol

  • Medication

  • Diapers

  • Job

  • Survival/protection

Warning Signs

Victims have no reason to be ashamed. It is not their fault.

 

It is very easy for traffickers to find victims with modern technology and social media. They pose as talent agents or children of the same age. They know exactly what they are doing because they are professionals. They have perfected their craft of manipulation. They know exactly who, when, where, and how to target their victims.

Characteristics of Traffickers (also known as pimps, johns, and exploiters):

  • Promises you things of value (listed above) in exchange for sexual acts

  • Secretive – doesn’t want you looking at their phone

  • Pressures you into getting a tattoo to remind you of them

  • Controls who you hang out with

  • Gets serious in the relationship too quickly

  • Pressures you into sexual acts that make you feel uncomfortable

  • Takes nude photos of you and shares them with others

  • Coaches you on what to say about your age and other personal information

  • Jealous and controlling

Signs to look for:

Children being trafficked are typically ages 11 – 16.

  • Signs of being abused such as bruising and burns

  • Unexplained absences from class

  • Sexualized behavior

  • Overly tired all the time

  • Withdrawn and depressed

  • Displays expensive items that have been bought for them

  • New tattoo (this is a way for a trafficker to brand the victims)

  • Older or new friends with a different lifestyle

  • Talks about wild parties they attend

Resources

National Sex Trafficking Hotline

Call: 1-888-373-7888

Text: 233733 type "Help" or "Info"

Alexandra House 24 Hour Hotline

763-780-2330

How You Can Help

To help someone in need:​

  • Call the police

A minor is protected under the Safe Harbor Law and seen as a victim.

  • Contact school teachers, counselors, or other staff.

  • Tell a parent or a friend’s parent

  • Call the hotlines

Listed above in Resources.

  • Contact county health and human services

Sherburne County Health and Human Services

To help combat the problem:

  • Get the word out that sex trafficking is here.

Tell your neighbors, coworkers, and even post on social media using #ItHappensHere2.

No one wants to believe it is happening in their own community, but this lack of awareness allows the problem to continue.

  • Educate others

Teach them the warning signs, resources available, and what they can do to help.

  • Volunteer

Contact the local Resources listed above for opportunities.

  • Contact your local and state representatives

Express your concern about sex trafficking and ask what they are doing to combat the problem. Find your representatives here.

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Sex Trafficking PSA Collaboration Team: